Thursday, December 27, 2007

Installing SSH Client on 1.1.2 iPhone (intel / PPC Mac)(Windows XP / Vista)


(Windows XP / Vista)
Once you have installed an SSH server on the iPhone, you need a way to communicate with that server. I'll show you how to install WinSCP, which is going to make hacking the iPhone a lot easier. WinSCP is a program similar to an FTP client where you can drag and drop files from your computer to a remote computer (in this case your iPhone).


  1. You need to know what IP address is being assigned to your iPhone. Press the "Home" button, "Settings", "Wi-Fi", select the name of your network by pressing the blue arrow on the right, then look where it says IP Address. On my iPhone it is 10.0.1.3.

  2. Next press "Home", "Settings", "General", "Auto-Lock", then select "Never". This will keep the iPhone from disconnecting the SSH connection while working with the program.

  3. Download WinSCP which you can get for free here. I downloaded the "Installation package" for WinSCP 4.0.5. Install and start the program. At the WinSCP program enter the following information. Host name 10.0.1.3 (or your IP address), User name root, Password alpine. Now go to the File protocol drop down box and select "SCP". Click "Login".

  4. It's slow to login to the iPhone so you'll probably get this warning screen. Don't click the "Abort" button. Just be patient.

  5. YOu'll get a warning screen I got. Just click "Yes".

  6. This is the program interface. In its default state it shows the directory structure of the computer in the left side window, and the directory structure of the iPhone in the right side window. At this point you can drag and drop files to and from the iPhone and to and from your computer. You can also right click files and perform various functions like renaming and deleting and setting permissions.

Warning



  • Running an SSH server on the iPhone has two inherent problems. The first is security. The password is known to be alpine. You were given the option to change this in the Step 1 guide when you used the 1.1.2 jailbreak program. If you didn't set a custom password in the Step 1 guide, no worries, here is how you change it using PuTTY. Login to your iPhone via SSH normally. Then type: passwd You will be prompted to enter a new password. You won't see it as you enter it though. You will then be prompted to enter it again. It must be at least five characters long. That's it.

  • The second problem with some versions of SSH, is battery drain. The battery can be drained if your version of SSH uses an active listener program that constantly waits for a login attempt so it can initiate the connection. When you used OktoPrep to aid in jailbreaking 1.1.2, part of the process was an option to install SSH, which came with a control panel to shut it off whenever you wanted. You should shut off SSH when not in use. Launch the SSH application. Slide the switch to turn it on or off. It seems like this application may have the ability to change the password at some point in the future.

(intel / PPC Mac) What I used: OS X (10.4.10 & 10.5)



  1. Once you have installed an SSH server on the iPhone (which was done if you used OktoPrep), you need a good way to communicate with that server. The Terminal, while useful, is limiting. Perhaps Homer Simpson said it best, years ago: Fugu me! I'll show you how to install Fugu, which is going to make hacking the iPhone a lot easier. Fugu is a graphical frontend to Mac OS X's command-line Secure File Transfer application (SFTP). SFTP is similar to FTP, but unlike FTP, the entire session is encrypted, meaning no passwords are sent in cleartext form, and is thus much less vulnerable to third-party interception

  2. On your iPhone, press Home, "Settings", "General", "Auto-Lock", then select "Never". This will keep the iPhone from disconnecting the SSH connection while using Fugu. Don't forget to set this back to 1 minute when you are done or your screen will never shut off, and your battery will run down very quickly.

  3. Before we can continue, we need to know what IP address is being assigned to your iPhone by your router. Press the Home button, Settings, Wi-Fi, select the name of your network by pressing the blue arrow on the right, then look where it says "IP Address". On my iPhone it is 10.0.1.5.

  4. Download Fugu here. Note: many FTP programs can be used to make this connection as well. I know Transmit is another popular application used to connect to the iPhone. Launch Fugu. In the Connect to: field enter your iPhone's IP. In the Username field enter root. In the Port: field enter 22. In the Directory: field enter /. Click "Connect". It could take up to 1 minute to login to Fugu on your first attempt.

  5. You will get a pop up. Just click "Continue".

  6. You should be at this screen. Your computer is on the left, your iPhone on the right. You can now transfer files between the two, install programs, make folders, set permissions, and delete anything you want with Fugu. I'll cover more of its functions as I need them in other tutorials. This is a drag and drop method of transferring files which is nice.

Warning



  • Running an SSH server on the iPhone has two inherent problems. The first is security. The password is known to be alpine. You were given the option to change this in the Step 1 guide when you used the 1.1.2 jailbreak program. If you didn't set a custom password in the Step 1 guide, no worries, here is how you change it using the Terminal. Login to your iPhone via SSH normally. Then type: passwd You will be prompted to enter a new password. You won't see it as you enter it though. You will then be prompted to enter it again. It must be at least five characters long. That's it.

  • The second problem with some versions of SSH, is battery drain. The battery can be drained if your version of SSH uses an active listener program that constantly waits for a login attempt so it can initiate the connection. When you used OktoPrep to aid in jailbreaking 1.1.2, part of the process was an option to install SSH, which came with a control panel to shut it off whenever you wanted. You should shut off SSH when not in use. Launch the SSH application. Slide the switch to turn it on or off. It seems like this application may have the ability to change the password at some point in the future.

IF SOMEONE HAS A QUESTION OR AN ERROR SEND ME AN EMAIL AND WE'LL TRY TO RESOLVE IT.


1 comment:

Lina Marcela said...

Thank you so much I could not do it without you